Media

0

Posted on by

There’s been a couple of little bits of press recently, well, quite a while ago now in one case.

At the start of September I was asked onto John Beatie’s lunchtime show on Radio Scotland to discuss the results of Radio 2’s greatest guitar riff of all time poll.  I got to play a little excerpt of Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Oh Well‘ which means I can tick something off my things to play live list.

Radio 1 Academy

0

Posted on by

Radio 1 academy 2014 kicks off in Glasgow on May the 10th. There’s a whole load of wrokshops and seminars including a guitarist masterclass on Tuesday the 13th at which I’ll be demonstrating. More details can be found at the end of this link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p017f6dt/profiles/faq

Music Theory

0

Posted on by

 

Music Theory can seem like a minefield of jargon and concepts to just about everybody at one time or another, but behind it all lie the fundementals that underpin everything:

1. There are 12 notes in western music:

1       2              3     4     5               6     7                  8      9       10              11        12              1
A,   A#/Bb,   B,   C,   C#/Db,   D,   D#/Eb,     E,     F,    F#/Gb,     G,      G#/Ab,    A

Skiffle

0

Posted on by

Every now and again I get asked to write an article for a website or magazine.  Last month, Dutch Website Onder Invloed celebrated it’s 5th birthday with a PDF magazine and I was asked to write about a musical influence, so I chose skiffle music.  You can download the PDF of the magazine from the Onder Invloed website:

 

Here’s a slightly longer version of the article than appeared in the magazine:

Blues Backing Tracks

0

Posted on by

Following on from the 12 bar blues post earlier this week, Here’s some blues backing tracks in 3 different keys to practise your chops against:

12 Bar Blues in E backing track
12 Bar Blues in A backing track
12 Bar Blues in G backing track
Chord Sequences – All tracks have a 2 bar intro

E:  E/E/E/E           A:  A/A/A/A                  G:  G/G/G/G
A/ A/ E/E                D/ D/ A/A                     C/ C/ G/G
B7/A/E/B7              E7/D/A/E7                   D7/C/G/D7

It’s Called a 12 Bar Blues

0

Posted on by

The 12 bar blues is almost certainly the most common form of blues, a music form that can be traced back to the late 19th century. Blues has its roots in Africa, although it is a quinticensually American music form which has many regional variations including, but not limited to Chicago blues, piedmont blues and mississippi delta blues. Musicians best known for piedmont blues include blind boy fuller, blind willie mctell, and possibly the best known sonny terry and brownie McGhee, with the style characterised by syncopated (meaning the emphasis is moved to between the beats) melody produced by playing the melody with the right and fingers while the right hand thumb keeps the beat.

Bluegrass Guitar

0

Posted on by

         

See and downlaod tablature of the music as a PDF

Bluegrass can be thought of as an offspring of country music. Like all country it has it’s roots in European folk music brought by settlers into the U.S. in the 19th century and combined there with an African influence including the use of the banjo.  The main instruments in early country music were fiddle, taken from the Scots and Irish traditions, the Spanish guitar and the banjo from Africa, with the music characterised by driving rhythms and songs singing of everyday experiences such as ranching, mining, logging as well as bank robberies, train crashes and desperados on the run.

How easy is it playing the banjo compared to guitar

0

Posted on by

As well as guitar, I also play mandolin and 5 string banjo, and, from guitarists, these often inspire a question along the lines of….how easy / hard is it to play the banjo / mandolin compared to the guitar. This isn’t actually that easy to answer as there are a couple of different things involved, but the bottom line is that if you can play the guitar a bit, then the finger movements needed to play banjo or mandolin shouldn’t be too difficult. What might be more tricky is to try not to play them like a guitar.

The Amazing Slow Downer

0

Posted on by

There are a lot of good resources out there on the web just now which make the job of learning a new song or technique a lot easier than in days gone by where you would have the song on a cassette (remember those) and rewind a 5 second section over and over or keep dropping the needle onto a section of a record trying to decode what was being played.

Favourite Mandolin Sites

0

Posted on by

As it says on the tin…..my favourite sites either dedicated to or featuring a lot f content about mandolin playing and technique.  I think anyone interested in the mandolin will enjoy these sites.  The internet is a big place, so please let me know of ay other great sites out there that I may have missed:

Nigel Gatherer – www.nigelgatherer/mando.html

1 2 3